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FOX 2.5 Factory Series Rear Reservoir Shocks for 0-1.5 in. Lift (09-19 2WD F-150; 04-19 4WD F-150, Excluding Raptor)

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$822.69 (pair)

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  • Item T527517

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    Features, Video & Details

    • Factory Series Rear Shock
    • Designed for 0-1.5" of Suspension Lift
    • External Oil Reservior
    • 2.5" Smooth Bore Alloy Shock Body
    • 7/8" Hard Chrome Alloy Steel Shaft
    • Sold As a Pair
    • Fits 2009-2019 2WD and 2004-2019 4WD F-150s, Excluding SVT Raptor Models

    Review & Installation Video

    Review & Install Video

    Hey, guys, Joe from AmericanTrucks. And today, I'm gonna be reviewing and showing you how to install the FOX 2.5 Factory Series Rear Reservoir Shocks fitting all stock ride height to 1.5-inch lifted 2009 and newer 2-wheel drive F-150s, all '04 and newer 4-wheel drive F-150s, excluding the Raptor models. Now, these rear shocks are going to be perfect for the F-150 owner who leans on their suspension a lot more than the average F-150 owner and is looking to upgrade with one of the best and well-manufactured set of shocks on the market. The body of the shock is 2.5-inch diameter steel. The reservoir is also going to be 2.5-inch diameter, but that is going to be an alloy. The components are CNC-machined 6061 aluminum. And lastly, the shaft is 7/8-inch diameter chrome-plated steel.&nbsp;<BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial"><BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial">So, why would you wanna upgrade your F-150 with a shock like this one? When you rapidly compress and expand a stock shock, or any shock for that matter, you're going to be generating a lot of heat. So, for instance, if you're on washboards in the desert or a trail that's just smooth enough to go through it quickly, you're going to be compressing and expanding the shock very, very quickly, generating a lot of heat. That's just the nature of pushing fluid through a small space. That heat is going to create small air bubbles in the fluid, which are going to compress easier than the fluid would. That's called cavitation and it's the main contributing factor to shock fade. Mainly, it has an external reservoir here. Now, that design is going to allow for a bigger volume of fluid in the shock, which is going to displace that heat way more effective than the factory shock would. It's also going to allow you to compress the shock to a shorter length and expand it to a longer length, because you have more fluid on tap to fill the gap in the shock. So, again, this is going to be perfect for the F-150 owner who's looking to lean on their shocks a little bit more, and these are intended actually for stock ride height or up to a 1.5-inch lift, so a great first mod if you plan on doing any speedy off-roading, again, on the washboards or on a trail that's smooth enough to go quickly, where you're compressing and expanding this shock rapidly.&nbsp;<BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial"><BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial">So one thing I did want to make a note of, this is going to be a nitrogen-charged shock. So, that is going to further this shock in the resistance of shock fade, but you trade a little bit of ride quality for that as this shock is going to be noticeably stiffer than the stock shocks. So we're trading a little bit of ride quality for more performance. Now, we're also bumping up the strength of those components. Another thing I like about this shock is that reservoir is hard-mounted with those 6061 aluminum components, so you're not dealing with that hose that could potentially catch on something, and I'm sure this setup with the aluminum and the hard-mounted reservoir is going to be way more durable than that hose would as well.<BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial"><BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial">So pricing for the rear set of shocks is going to be around the $950 mark. Now, while that may sound expensive, you are getting one of the best manufactured and well-engineered shocks in the business, from one of the biggest brands in the business. But if you don't plan on leaning on your shocks pretty commonly, this kit is going to be overkill. There are definitely some shock upgrades out there without the reservoir that could do your trucks some good before you need something like this.&nbsp;<BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial"><BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial">Install for the shock is going to be on the easy side of two out of three wrenches. Should only take you two or three hours to get it installed with some basic hand tools. So, without any further ado, let me show you how it's done. Tools required for this install include an 18-millimeter wrench, 3/8 drive ratchet, 1/2-inch drive 5/8-inch socket, or you could probably get away with a 15-millimeter socket here that's gonna go on the torque wrench, 3/8 drive 15-millimeter socket, pry bar, and a torque wrench.<BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial"><BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial">So we're going to start with removal of the factory shocks. Now, in order to get these out, there is a little bit of a dance we're gonna have to do. So we got the pole jack in place. You could use a floor jack as well. What we're going to do here is put this under a little bit of pressure, just to lift our axle up a tiny bit. Then we're gonna remove this 18-millimeter nut off the bolt, leaving the bolt in the shock. Then we're going to move back to the pole jack, keep applying pressure to that, and use this bolt as a guide as to when that shock is loose. So we're gonna jack this up slowly. As soon as the pressure is relieved off the shock, the bolt should slide right out. Then we'll just undo the top and replace it with our new shocks.&nbsp;<BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial"><BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial">So, first off, again, we're just going to apply a little bit of pressure to our axle. Next, we're going to take off this 18-millimeter nut, and that's not under a lot of torque. It only goes to about 66 foot-pounds, so we got a wrench and a ratchet to take that nut off. So, with that nut off, we can now put a little bit more pressure on the pole jack as needed. This actually looks pretty loose where we are at right there. I think the bolt is loose in there and just resting on that rubber isolator in the bottom of the shock. So I might get a pry bar, might even be able to use the threads, and then this bolt should pull right out. So, now, we can move onto the top one, and again, it's just a 15-millimeter socket. This side has a wing on it, so that's all you need to get that out. And with that, you could put some upward pressure on the shock, pull out the bolt, and drop out the shock.<BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial"><BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial">So, that brings us to the main difference between these two, and that is this guy right here, the external reservoir. Now, this external reservoir is going to give us basically a higher volume of oil in the shock and going to allow us to compress this to a shorter length and extend this to a longer length, all while keeping it cool. Compared to the stock shock, this is going to make a lot less heat, just because we have more oil capacity and that 6061 aluminum is going to help as well, so this is going to stand up to any rough terrain, consistently, for any length of time and not fade, at least as quickly as the stock shock would. So this is going to stand up to the test when you're compressing and expanding this. That tends to make a lot of heat. This is going to do a lot better at expelling that heat, making sure this stays cool, therefore, making sure you have less shock fade, if any at all, than the factory shock.<BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial"><BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial">So, without any further ado, let me show you how to get this on your truck. We're going to grab that stock hardware we just took off and our ratchet and put this back together. So, all we're gonna do is just a reverse of the install. We have our shock and the upper bolt here, we can lift that up, and slide out bolt in place. Now, I just had to slide that back a little bit to get our nut started there. And next, I'm just gonna grab the ratchet and hand-tighten that. So, at this point, we have the shock hanging on our truck. We're gonna lower the pole jack, compress this a little bit, and get it mounted to our axle.&nbsp;<BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial"><BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial">So we compressed our shock a little bit, and this thing is pretty difficult to compress compared to the stock shock. So we used a little bit of a pry bar on the bottom edge here. A ratchet strap would have worked as well. But once you have it seated, you can run the bolt through and then tighten that down, again, with an 18-millimeter wrench and a 15-millimeter socket.<BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial"><BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial">Now, at this point, we have our bolt with the nut started on both ends. Now, there is a torque spec for this, it's 66 foot-pounds, same thing goes for up there. This is on an '18 5.0 F-150. If you have anything else, I would look up the torque specs online real quick and make sure that these are dialed in correctly. So, with that being said, we have our torque wrench, 5/8 socket, and we're going to torque these down. And same thing for up top. All right, and the shock is in. Procedure is going to be the same thing for the passenger side.<BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial"><BR style="FONT-SIZE: 12px; WHITE-SPACE: normal; WORD-SPACING: 0px; TEXT-TRANSFORM: none; FONT-WEIGHT: 400; COLOR: rgb(51,51,51); FONT-STYLE: normal; TEXT-ALIGN: justify; ORPHANS: 2; WIDOWS: 2; LETTER-SPACING: normal; BACKGROUND-COLOR: rgb(248,248,248); font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial">And that is gonna do it for my review and install of the FOX 2.5 Factory Series Rear Reservoir Shocks, fitting stock ride height to 1.5-inch lifted 2009 and newer 2-wheel drive F-150s, all '04 and newer 4-wheel drive F-150s, excluding the Raptor models. Thank you for watching. I'm Joe. And for all things Ford, keep it right here at americantrucks.com.

    Superior Ride Quality. Invest in your F-150's ride quality with the FOX 2.5 Factory Series Reservoir Rear Shock designed for 0-1.5" of suspension lift. This Factory Series F-150 Shock features race developed high flow pistons, and an external oil reservoir to maintain superior performance both on and off road to suit your truck's needs.

    External Reservoir. The FOX Reservoir comes equipped with an external reservoir to keep oil and high pressure nitrogen separate. The reservoir is filled with JM92 advanced suspension fluid to ensure performance in a wide range of temperatures and climates.

    Durable Construction. This F-150 Reservoir features a smooth, 2.5" seamless alloy for superior durability. It is completed in a zinc plating and dual clear coat finish for a long lasting finish and black anodized CNC-machined 6061-T6 billet aluminum. This shock is fitted with a 7/8" hard chrome plated alloy steel that has been heat treated to handle anything you throw at your rig during any on or off road adventure.

    Bolt-On Installation. The reservoir doesn't require any upgrades or modifications to your F-150, as it is a direct replacement for the stock and most aftermarket lift kit shocks.

    Application. This pair of Rear FOX 2.5 Factory Series Reservoir Shocks is specifically design to fit on all 2009 to 2019 2WD and 2004-2019 4WD Ford F-150s equipped with 0-1.5" of suspension lift. Does not fit SVT Raptor models.

    Fitment: 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 Details

    MPN# 883-24-002

    CA Residents: WARNING: Cancer and Reproductive Harm - www.P65Warnings.ca.gov

    What's in the Box
    • (2) 2.5 Factory Series Reservoir Rear Shock
    Installation Info
    Tech Specs
    Reservoir Specifications.
    • Bearing: PTFE-lined, Heat-Treated, Alloy Steel Spherical
    • Body: 2.5 in. Smooth Bore & Seamless Alloy
    • Body Plating: Zinc-Plated & Double-Clear Coat
    • Components: Black-Anodized, CNC-Machined 6061-T6 Billet Aluminum
    • External Reservoir: 2.5 in. Smooth Bore & Honed Seamless Alloy
    • Oil: JM92 Advanced Suspension Fluid
    • Piston: High-Flow Design
    • Shaft: 7/8 in. Hard-Chrome Plated Heat-Treated Alloy Steel
    Will it fit my F-150?
    • 2.7L V6 EcoBoost - 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
    • 3.0L V6 Power-Stroke - 18, 19
    • 3.3L V6 - 18, 19
    • 3.5L V6 - 15, 16, 17
    • 3.5L V6 EcoBoost - 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
    • 3.5L V6 EcoBoost Limited - 19
    • 3.7L V6 - 11, 12, 13, 14
    • 4.6L V8 - 04, 05, 06, 07, 08, 09, 10
    • 5.0L V8 - 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
    • 5.4L V8 - 04, 05, 06, 07, 08, 09, 10
    • 6.2L V8 - 11, 12, 13, 14

    Does not fit SVT Raptor models

      Customer Photos

        Questions & Answers (6)

        5 Top Rated Questions

        Can these be used with the Air Lift Performance Loadlifter 5000 Ultimate system? Looking to increase my Lariat's towing and off-road abilities.

        • The FOX 2.5 Factory Series Rear Reservoir Shocks can be used with the Air Lift Performance Loadlifter 5000 Ultimate system.

        Helpful (0)

        Can I pair this with the front 0-2" coilovers?

        • The FOX 2.5 Factory Series Rear Reservoir Shocks foe 0-1.5" lifts can be paired with coil overs for 0-2" lifts as long as your total lift amount falls within the sizing of both sets.

        Helpful (0)

        Can these be used with a lowered rear end (1.5in)? Thank you

        • Unfortunately, these Rear Reservoir Shocks from Fox are only intended for stock ride hight or any lift up too 1.5". This product is not intended for any F-150 that is lowered.

        Helpful (0)

        I have a 6 in. lift, will these work/fit with the lift?

        • These will not work with a 6 inch lift as it will only work for a 0-1.5" lifted F-150.

        Helpful (0)

        Does this change the towing capacity of the truck?

        • This will not change the towing capacity of the truck when installed.

        Helpful (0)
        Post Your Question
        1 More Question
        will the shocks fit with a 4 inch lift kit? 1 answer

          Customer Reviews (1) Write a Review

          Overall Rating 5

          out of 5 stars

          Installation Time:Less than 1 Hour

          • Dry Traction 5 5
          • Wet Traction 3 3
          • Snow Traction 4 4
          • Road Noise 5 5
          • Onroad Ride Quality 3 3



          • 5/5

            Installation Time: Less than 1 Hour

            July 02, 2018

            Great shocks for offroad!

            I have had these on my truck for about 2 weeks now. They made my daily driving a bit rough, but handle offroad very well. There is no more axle hop. I think once I get my deaver springs on these will be a dream all around. These are great shocks and I would recommend to anyone!

            JasonP

            Year: 2018 Engine: 2.7L V6 Ecoboost

            Helpful (14)